Lightning Dissipation Spur

The Lightning Spur is a very efficient hybrid lightning dissipator. When operating as a shield it reduces the potential between the tower and storm cell by transferring electrical charge to the adjacent ionizing air molecules. This transference represents dissipation or the controlled leakage of the charge, thus reducing the probability of a lightning strike.

A Lightning Dissipation System, with the economy of a lightning rod

Lightning is the leading cause of weather related damage to broadcast equipment. With average lightning currents of 20 to 30 kiloamps and heat energy in excess of 20,000 °C, the need for improved lightning protection is evident.

The Lightning Spur is a very efficient hybrid lightning dissipator. When operating as a shield it reduces the potential between the tower and storm cell by transferring electrical charge to the adjacent ionizing air molecules. This transference represents dissipation or the controlled leakage of the charge, thus reducing the probability of a lightning strike.

If the electric charge accumulation rate far exceeds the dissipation rate the Lightning Spur will divert a lightning strike away from the protected equipment and toward a safe, predetermined path to earth.

Lightning strikes can cause various types of damage. Large peak voltages damage transmission lines and voltage sensitive devices. Lightning’s electrical currents often result in an energy transfer and heat. The heat energy can literally melt electrically conductive components including transmitting antennas.

Sudden increase in temperature of non-conductive materials can result in significant structural damage. Lightning damage to the guy wire insulator or to the concrete guy wire anchor could result in tower failure. The addition of an A-I Lightning Spur offers increased protection for critical path, lower level antennas.

 Device 
Dissipation at 350 kv/m 
Survival Wind (1)
Wind Force (2) 
CaAa (3) 
Method of Attachment 
No Ice 
1/2 inch Ice 
No Ice 
1/2 inch Ice 
No Ice 
1/2 inch Ice 
mA
miles/hr
m/s
miles/hr
m/s
lbf
N
lbf
N
ft²
ft²
 A-3 Lightning Spur 1100 188.00 84.04 153.00 68.40 207.00 920.78 322.00 1432.33 7.91 0.73 12.32 1.14 bracket with 1/2” structural bolts
 C-2 Lightning Spur 920 132.00 59.01 107.00 47.83 96.00 427.03 165.00 733.96 3.52 0.33 6.12 0.57 threaded rod thru beacon plate
Wire Sphere 790 59.00 26.38 5.00 2.24 50.00 222.41 401.00 1783.74 1.83 0.17 14.57 1.35 hose clamp to leg
 Crow’s Nest 690 112.00 50.07 74.00 33.08 192.00 854.06 347.00 1543.53 7.08 0.66 12.91 1.20 threaded rod thru beacon plate
Wire brush 6 -around 450 100.00 44.70 10.00 4.47 67.00 298.03 157.00 698.37 2.40 0.22 5.64 0.52 hose clamp to leg
 A-1 Lightning Spur 370 188.00 84.04 153.00 68.40 66.00 293.58 104.00 462.62 1.97 0.18 3.44 0.32 bracket with 1/2” structural bolts
Wire brush 3 -around 265 100.00 44.70 10.00 4.47 34.00 151.24 79.00 351.41 1.20 0.11 2.82 0.26 hose clamp to leg
 Lightning Rod 4’ copper 75 82.00 36.66 51.00 22.80 7.00 31.14 18.00 80.07 0.25 0.02 0.65 0.06  threaded rod thru beacon plate
Notes: (1) Survival wind speed has NO safety factor and is based upon TIA/EIA-222-F Standard, K= I, Gh= I, and material yield strengths of; copper = 10,000 psi, stainless steel = 36,000 psi, A-36 steel = 36,000 psi, A-449 steel = 92,000 psi. (2) PSF windload based upon TIA/EIA-222-C Standard criteria of 50 pounds per sq. ft. for flat surface area and 33 pounds per sq. ft. for round surface area. (3) CaAa based upon TIA/EIA-222-F Standard criteria and includes mounting brackets.

Purpose

  • Shields structure by reducing the electric potential of the tower or structure.
  • Divert the electrostatic energy away from critical equipment and toward a safe path to earth.
  • Divert the electrostatic

Features and Benefits

  • Exceptional electrical dissipation characteristics
  • No antenna and beacon interference
  • 180 mph survival wind speed
  • Low cost, replaceable dissipating tips

Related Publications

Structural Components and Accessories Brochure

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